POLTERGEIST

HOME REVIEWS FEO'S STUFF FEO AMANTE THEATER SCIENCE MOMENT UNFAIR RACIAL CLICHÉ ALERT
FEO FEED BACK?
NEWS?
SUBMISSIONS?
Read:
SUBMISSION
GUIDELINES

MOVIES
FEO AMANTE THEATER
My Short Films
LAST CALL

THE NIGHT MY MONSTER DIED
SCIENCE MOMENT
TOP TEN SCARY MOVIES
UNFAIR RACIAL CLICHÉ ALERT
RACIAL CLICHÉ RESPONSE
INTERVIEWS

STORY TIME

COMICS

CONS

HORRIBLE NEWS
Movies Eddie McMullen Jr. Review by
E.C.McMullen Jr.
Poltergeist
Bookmark and Share
SHOULD YOU?
TIP JAR
POLTERGEIST - 1982
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) / SLM Production Group
U.S. Release, June, 4
Rated: Argentina, Iceland, Netherlands, Norway, West Germany: 16 / Australia: M / Brazil, Chile: 14 / Canada: A / Finland: K-16 / France: -16 / Italy: VM14 / Portugal: M/16 / South Korea: 12 / UK: 15 / Singapore, USA: PG / Sweden: 15

Some of you may not know that though director Tobe Hooper was credited for directing POLTERGEIST, he sued to have his name removed from it (he lost). He wanted his name removed because he didn't get to direct hardly any of it, certainly no more than a second unit director. Even the actors involved went on record as saying they hardly ever saw Tobe, and Steven Speilberg really directed POLTERGEIST. And this makes sense because there is nothing about POLTERGEIST that looks like anything Tobe has done before or since. And everything about this movie has Speilberg's foot and fingerprints all over every frame, every edit, every cue of the emotional string pulling soundtrack.

So for this review, I'm just going to talk as if Speilberg (JAWS, JURASSIC PARK, THE LOST WORLD, MINORITY REPORT, WAR OF THE WORLDS) did it, because he wrote it, produced it, was on the set directing or co-directing with Tobe Hooper practically the whole time. He supervised the visual effects for it, which were produced at ILM under the supervision of Richard Edlund (FRIGHT NIGHT, BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA, ALIEN³, SPECIES) and Dennis Muren (TERMINATOR 2, JURASSIC PARK, THE LOST WORLD, HULK, WAR OF THE WORLDS). Steven took full control of Post; was responsible for the editing of the film, the final sound mixes and loops, the supervision of the visual effects, and the selection of Jerry Goldsmith as the composer of the score.*

So anyway, Steven Speilberg totally made this movie himself.

POLTERGEIST begins with the National Anthem and a severe close-up of a television screen. A television station is ending its broadcast day, which is what TV stations used to do in 1981. Then the screen goes static. A man sleeps in front of his TV and the family dog walks around, checking everyone for junk food, which this family has in abundance. They go to sleep eating crap, and the dog does his rounds at night, eating their leftovers. Then a little blonde girl wakes up, goes downstairs, and starts talking to the television set. She talks so loud at the white noise that the other family members wake up and watch in silence. Then nothing.

For nearly the first full 15 minutes of POLTERGEIST, nothing scary is actually happening. There are signs that something is amiss - not quite right - but nothing scary. Instead, we're getting to know the family: Mom aka Diane Freeling (JoBeth Williams: THE DAY AFTER, POLTERGEIST II) & Dad aka Steve (Craig T. Nelson: THE RETURN OF COUNT YORGA, POLTERGEIST II, THE DEVIL'S ADVOCATE, THE INCREDIBLES), Oldest daughter, Dana (Dominique Dunne), middle son, Robbie (Oliver Robbins: POLTERGEIST II), and the youngest, Carol-Anne (Heather O'Rourke: POLTERGEIST [all]). So that's okay because this movie was made back in 1981 when people weren't pea-brained nitwits with the attention span of a... Hey god damn it! Pay attention!

*
According to
POLTERGEIST TRIVIA at
IMDb.com

^
TRIVIA
Before you dismiss this out of hand as movie marketing anecdotal, I should tell you: I'm an Uncle of many years standing.

On Halloween, I've brought scary masks to my neices and nephews and watched them cower back (admittedly, I go for broke on the REALLY scary masks.). I patiently show them that it is just rubber. I turn it inside out, let them touch the latex rubber, the sewn in fake fur, stick their fingers through the eyeholes and, if the mask has them, the nose-holes (kids and noseholes, seriously!). And then, after all of that, when I think that it is all okay, I turn the mask back rightside in. Six year olds and down go right back into fright mode.

So I calm them down again, demonstrate that the inside that they touched, is merely one side of the outside, that frightens them. Once they've finally come to terms with this (
again with the sticking of fingers in the various rubber orifices) I explain that I'm now going to put it on.

I very slowly put it on, verbally walking them through it all. The second they see my eyes appear behind the eyeholes, they FREAK!

So I've learned to stop doing that. It isn't just one 6 year old or under kid, it's all of them. The one who understands would be the anomoly.

The next thing that happens is Mom has a problem with her dining room furniture. It's a fascinating moment, a real attention getter. Then in the next scene, we see how quickly and easily Diane can adapt to the strange.

It's after the half hour mark before the full force of what is going on in their house becomes evident and that is when the house attacks the family.

Speilberg wasn't shy about putting kids in danger (and by that I mean the characters and not his actual child actors) and the house and the tree go after the youngest first. In fact, this part of the movie was so scary for the six year-old Heather O'Rourke to even film that she broke down screaming on the set. Speilberg stopped everything, grabbed Heather and held her promising that she wouldn't have to do the scene anymore.^

Everyone who has seen the trailer knows that Carol Anne disappears somehow in the house. The grim grinning ghosts have taken her to the other side.

Dad isn't sure what to do, but he's damn sure what not to do and that's go to the cops. Cops as a rule don't cotton to stories of children who are missing because they've been possessed by a house, or ghosts in a house, or a TV set.

Naw, there's just no way to sanely explain the thing to cops. So Steve goes to the local University where he knows there is a Paranormal Department (back in the 1980s when Universities were still willing to give such Hoo doo hucksters credibility - or like modern Columbia University today). There he meets the ghostly busting crew of Dr. Lesh (Beatrice Straight: CHILLER), and her two assistants, Ryan (Richard Lawson: SUGAR HILL, AUDREY ROSE) and Marty (Martin Casella: ROBOCOP 2).

When Steve brings them back to his house, they try to impress him with their enthusiasm, research, and ultra-light experience. Then Steve opens the door to his children's bedroom and their lives change forever. Nothing in their combined years of experience has prepared them for the Freeling house. Which is when they bring in the big guns in the form of a psychic named Tangina (Zelda Rubinstein: POLTERGEIST [all], ANGUISH, LITTLE WITCHES, WISHCRAFT, BEHIND THE MASK: THE RISE OF LESLIE VERNON).

Steven Spielberg wanted the setting and place of POLTERGEIST to be so much in the now - as if the Freelings could be your next door neighbors and the whacked out stuff that happens is something that could easily happen to you. To do that, he made everything relevant to the lives of his protagonists. From the way people watched TV, to their remote controls, to the problems common with household appliances, right down to teaching your daughter the proper way to handle the creepy workmen who dig your swimming pool in your backyard.

There are pointed references about clothing, sexual mores, mention of being "punk", and product placement in nearly every scene. As a haunted house movie, POLTERGEIST really spoke to the audience of its era. Today, however, it can only pass as a period piece movie: This is what happened back in the faraway past.

Special kudos must go to Beatrice Straight, as the lonely Professor looking for answers among the dead, and Zelda Rubinstein, who grabbed everyone's attention as the self-assured psychic who knows exactly what to do in the strangest of cases. Kudos must also go to SFX artist, Gary Platek (RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK, AMITYVILLE 3D, GHOST BUSTERS, GREMLINS, TOTAL RECALL, JURASSIC PARK), whose wizardry at cloud effects from 25 years ago remains unrivaled by modern cgi today.

In some ways, POLTERGEIST is ripe for a possible remake. In many other ways, we could do better. The addendum ending in particular shoots straight into disbelief land, not so much for the ghosts we see, but the fact that it betrays its own logic from everything we've come to learn of the family. There's just no way they would DO that.

Yet POLTERGEIST set a bar. And there is a huge difference between setting a bar and merely resetting it with a remake. The world is full of good haunted house stories and POLTERGEIST is one of them, but it isn't the only one or even the best one. Still, if you've never seen it, I'd be willing to bet that it will raise goosebumps.

Four Shriek Girls.

Shriek GirlsShriek GirlsShriek GirlsShriek Girls
This review copyright 2009 E.C.McMullen Jr.

Bookmark and Share Poltergeist (1982) on IMDb

Return to Movies

FEO AMANTE'S HORROR THRILLER Created by:
E.C.MULLEN JR.
COME FOLLOW ME -
AMAZON
BLOG
DEVIANT ART
ECMJR - PORTFOLIO
FACEBOOK
IMDB
PANDORA
ROTTEN TOMATOES
STAGE32
TWITTER
YOUTUBE

 

BLU-RAY


SOUNDTRACK


POSTER

 

FROM
E.C. McMullen Jr.
WILLOW BLUE
Willow Blue
"'Willow Blue' will burrow under your skin and stay there long after you've put the book down."
- Jeffrey Reddick, Creator of FINAL DESTINATION

PERPETUAL BULLET
Perpetual Bullet Paperback
"'Some People' ... may be the standout story in the book."
- John Grant, 2 time Hugo Winner and creator of Infinityplus

ALSO

E.C. McMullen Jr.'s
short story
CEDO LOOKED LIKE PEOPLE
in the anthology
FEAR THE REAPER

"This Ray Bradbury-esque is one of the most memorable and one of the more original stories I've read in a long time."
- Reviewer, Amazon
I will take you home...Feo Amante's Horror Home Page, Feo Amante's Horror Thriller, and feoamante.com are owned and
Copyright 1997 - 2015 by E.C.McMullen Jr.
FAIR USE - PRIVACY POLICY - OWNERSHIP - CONTACT
All images and text belong to E.C.McMullen Jr. unless otherwise noted.
All fiction stories belong to their individual authors.